Wyndham History
Menu

Carter's housing estate,
College Road, Mary Avenue, Carter Crescent and Anderson Street, Werribee

Citation

Wyndham City Libraries, “Carter's housing estate, College Road, Mary Avenue, Carter Crescent and Anderson Street, Werribee,” Wyndham History, accessed July 14, 2020, http://www.wyndhamhistory.net.au/items/show/1024.
Description

A subdivision and housing estate created by the Carter family.

Source

City of Wyndham Heritage Study 1997

Description

A subdivision and housing estate created by the Carter family.

Title

Carter's housing estate,
College Road, Mary Avenue, Carter Crescent and Anderson Street, Werribee

Subject

Carter Housing estate, Werribee (Vic.), Bliss, W. J., Carter, Jack,

Creator

Wyndham City Libraries

Source

City of Wyndham Heritage Study 1997

Publisher

Context Pty Ltd

Date

1997

Contributor

Dr Carlotta Kellaway

Format

text

Language

eng

Type

Text

A subdivision and housing estate created by the Carter family, adopting remarkably similar consistent design style through the use of several simple, but distinctive house designs.  The predominant materials are cream and red brick, often used together with one the main colour and the other used for string courses.  The houses are all double-fronted with hipped, tiled roofs.  Some retain low brick fences, while others have no fence.  The streetworks are also consistent throughout, although some changes have been made.  The roads were originally concrete (now asphalt) with concrete kerb and gutters.  Street trees (mainly Ash – Fraxinus species) remain in several streets.

One of the house designs is unusual, with each bay curved towards the front door and on the outer corners, and a cantilevered roof over the front porch – a Moderne influence.  The use of an architect for this estate appears to reflect a family interest and respect for fine, contemporary architecture, well-evidenced in the three large houses they built for themselves around the same period.

This estate of about 66 red brick and cream brick veneer houses was constructed between 1941 and 1954 for the Carter family, successful poultry farmers.  The designs for these stylish and substantial houses were prepared by the Kew architect, W. J. Bliss.  They are examples of workers housing built for Carter employees.

Some years earlier, in the 1920s, the Carter Brothers opened a poultry farm in Greaves Street within the Police Paddock subdivision.  By 1925, Carters Poultry farm was said to the largest in the southern hemisphere.

The outbreak of the Second World War brought prosperity to some district industries, including poultry farming.  During the early 1940s, Jack Carter established a second and larger poultry farm on a new subdivision in Lock Avenue.  This comprised a complex of brick factory buildings.

At the same time, in the 1940s, the Carter subdivision for a housing estate was registered, comprising Allotments 17A, 18, 22 and 23 on the west side of College Road.  Three new streets were created by the subdivision; Mary Avenue, Carter Crescent and Anderson Street.  The greatest number of brick veneer houses in the estate were built in 1941 and 1942 and located along College Road, Mary Avenue and Carter Crescent.  They were owned by various members of the Carter family and tenanted.   During the late 1940s and early 1950s six more brick houses were built in Anderson Street and a further three were built in College Road between 1952 and 1954.

The houses in the Carter estate followed the popular ideal for working class housing in the period after the First World War.  The “ill-planned, crowded and narrow residential rows”, a feature of such housing last century, gave way to the construction of detached small houses.  They were located in streets, often with concrete roadways suitable for the new “motor suburbs”.  This new concept in residential housing was derived from the American Bungalow estates of that era.  An early example of this trend in Victoria is the old Kodak Estate in Kew, which dated from 1927.

During the 1940s when the Carter estate was established private estate building in suburban Melbourne was curtailed as a result of the restrictions of the National Security Regulations.  In early 1942 there was a ban on new house construction with 25 miles (20 kms)  of the Melbourne GPO, which brought to a halt the development of the A. V. Jennings Beauview Estate in East Ivanhoe.  However, during these war years public housing projects flourished.  The Victorian Housing Commission continued to construct “essential housing” in brick and timber.  In 1941, for example, the Richmond Housing Commission Estate was established with 116 brick houses designed in semi-detached pairs.

During the post-war 1950s period the ownership of many of the Carter estate houses changed hands.  The new owners were often Italian families who had moved to the Werribee district.  March 1951 saw an agreement which began large-scale migration from Italy to Australia.

Comments

Comments

Ask a question