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Rowland Carter house,
Russell Street (corner Lock Avenue),
Werribee

Citation

Wyndham City Libraries, “Rowland Carter house,
Russell Street (corner Lock Avenue),
Werribee,” Wyndham History, accessed December 9, 2019, http://www.wyndhamhistory.net.au/items/show/1058.
Description

Substantial brick home built on the corner of Lock and Russell Streets.

Source

City of Wyndham Heritage Study 1997

Description

Substantial brick home built on the corner of Lock and Russell Streets.

Title

Rowland Carter house,
Russell Street (corner Lock Avenue),
Werribee

Subject

Carter, Rowland, Pretty, Arthur, Wythe, L. J., Loates, R. G., Carter, Jack,

Creator

Wyndham City Libraries

Source

City of Wyndham Heritage Study 1997

Publisher

Context Pty Ltd

Date

1997

Contributor

Dr Carlotta Kellaway

Format

text

Language

eng

Type

Text

This substantial brick home, built on a large site on the corner of Lock and Russell Streets, is an outstanding example of the Moderne style, one of several examples in Werribee.  The house demonstrates many of the key characteristics of this style: asymmetrical composition, flat roof and parapet, use of cream brick with sparing brown decoration, metal framed windows and cantilevered porch detailed in brown and glass brick.

The house is set well back from the street, enclosed within a mature, leafy garden, and is reached via a circular drive.  The two main street frontages are enclosed by a low, cream brick fence.

This was one of three substantial architect-designed residences constructed from the late 1930s for the members of the Carter family, successful Werribee poultry farmers.  The Battleship was designed in 1940 by architect, Arthur Pretty for Rowland Carter.  It took nine months to build and was designed in the Moderne style with bricks glazed and graded from dark to light.

Art Deco, “the decorative style which developed from the 1925 Exposition of Decorative Arts in Paris” was “related in terms of style and motif” to “the American Zig Zag or Jazz architecture of the late 1920s and early ‘30s, which soon became popular in Australia”  where it was referred to as Moderne.

As Bruce Raworth explains in his study “Our inter-war houses”, the Moderne style in Australia sought to “capture the sleek lines and sharp or rounded corners associated with the fast and the modern”.  Its aesthetic “was related to that of contemporary ocean liners, automobiles and aeroplanes”.  Burnham Beeches at Sherbrooke in Victoria, designed by Harry Norris in 1933 for Alfred Nicholas, is regarded as “an outstanding example of Modern ship style”.

Rowland Carter secured the site in the late 1930s.  Two earlier small dwellings in Allotment 18J in a recently-subdivided part of the Werribee Estate were owned by L. J. Wythe and R. G. Loates.  With the completion of the new grand residence in 1940, the valuation of the property soared from £28 to £250.

This was the period when Jack Carter opened a large new poultry farm complex in Lock Avenue (to the south of this house).  Two years earlier, in 1938, Walter Carter’s splendid new residence, Shirwal Court (now Villa Franca) was built on the corner of Deutgam and Greaves Streets.  This substantial house was also designed in the popular Art Deco style by the same architect, Arthur Pretty.

By the early 1950s Rowland Carter’s residence in Russell Street had a valuation of £330.  It has remained in the Carter family ownership and in 1997 was the home of Charmaine Carter, daughter of Rowland Carter.

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